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128 posts categorized "Health 2.0"

March 23, 2015

Meaningful Use Stage 3: The Buzz About APIs

8682047014_0fc52e163c_kThe Meaningful Use - Stage 3 proposed rule has been released, with official publication due on March 30. Llikewise, the 2015 edition of EHR certification criteria and related rules. Check out the CMS presser and ONC fact sheet.

Key to these rules, which lay the foundation for a post-Meaningful Use incentive-driven Health IT ecosystem, is the use of APIs - for the uninitiated,  "application programming interfaces" - or simplified connectors that allow for easier transfer of data.

The Meaningful Use requirements have themselves been simplified -- whittled down to eight high-level requirements, expressed as program goals or objectives:

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February 03, 2015

ONC, Interoperability, and the 2/6/2015 #HITsm Tweetchat

HITsmI am pleased to be moderating the weekly #HITsm tweetchat this Friday, February 6, 2015 -- Beyond Meaningful Use: What’s next for ONC … and the rest of us. Join us at 12 noon Eastern Time.

Top of mind for the #HITsm twitterati this week are the ONC interoperability roadmap released at the end of last week, and the ONC conference taking place this week in DC. Check out the ONC liveblogging from Mark Scrimshire (aka @ekivemark), and the #ONC2015 tweetstream at large.

Here are the topics for this week's chat. I look forward to discussing them with you.

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January 30, 2015

Privacy and Security and the Internet of Things

"Only Connect"

In the future, everything will be connected.

That future is almost here.

Over a year ago, the Federal Trade Commission held an Internet of Things workshop and it has finally issued a report summarizing comments and recommendations that came out of that conclave.

As in the case of the HITECH Act's attempt to increase public confidence in electronic health records by ramping up privacy and security protections for health data, the IoT report -- and an accompanying publication with recommendations to industry regarding taking a risk-based approach to development, adhering to industry best practices (encryption, authentication, etc.) -- seeks to increase the public's confidence, but is doing it the FTC way: no actual rules, just guidance that can be used later by the FTC in enforcement cases. The FTC can take action against an entity that engages in unfair or deceptive business practices, but such practices are defined by case law (administrative and judicial), not regulations, thus creating the U.S. Supreme Court and pornography conundrum -- I can't define it, but I know it when I see it (see Justice Stewart's timeless concurring opinion in Jacobellis v. Ohio).

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October 14, 2014

Apple HealthKit - Epic Integration at Ochsner Health System - David Harlow Interviews Dr. Richard Milani

Apple-healthkitThe first health system to announce that it had integrated HealthKit into its Epic EHR is Ochsner Health System in Louisiana. It is a 12-hospital, 40-clinic operation with over 900 physicians. I spoke recently with Dr. Richard Milani, Ochsner's Chief Clinical Transformation Officer. He was enthusiastic about the improvements in clinical outcomes realized to date through homegrown integrations of things like Withings scales, and sees significant expanded potential using the Epic-HealthKit integration including dissemination of data to clinicians for more efficient and effective management of care and presentation of data to patients in a way that may motivate behavior change to improve health status.

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October 02, 2014

mHealth Fitness Trackers Have a Long Way to Go

10123541544_80f31e218d_oA report on a survey regarding wearable fitness trackers arrived in the HealthBlawger's mailbox this week. An interesting dose of reality, after spending a few days in Silicon Valley recently with a cadre of early adopters.

Here are the highlights:

>> 74.9 percent of adults do not track their weight, diet, or exercise using a fitness tracking device or app
>> The most commonly cited reason for not tracking fitness or health is a general lack of interest (27.2 percent), followed by concerns over device cost (17.7 percent)
>> 43.7 percent respondents did not have a specific reason for not tracking their fitness
>> 57.1 percent of non-tracking adults said that the possibility of lower health insurance premiums would make them more likely to use a fitness tracking device
>> Less than half of respondents (44.3 percent) said that better healthcare advice from their physician would be an incentive to use a fitness tracker

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October 01, 2014

HealthCamp Boston, November 3, 2014 - Register Now For The Health Innovation Unconference

HCBOS-logo-sqHealthCamp is heading back to Boston. Once again we will be at the Microsoft NERD in Cambridge, MA. This was the venue for the inaugural HealthCamp Boston in 2009 and for the second edition in 2012. We are excited to be returning to this fabulous facility.

Register now!

Our date is set. HealthCamp Boston will take place on Monday November 3, 2014.

This is the day before the Digital Healthcare Innovation Summit. So come a day early and really turbocharge your conference experience by joining other passionate healthcare innovation people at Health Care’s leading unconference – HealthCamp.

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September 17, 2014

Waiting for HIPAA Clarity? Who Has Time?

VaultI recently read that the App Association (aka ACT) is lobbying Congress to promote clarity in HIPAA regulations for app developers, based in part on the experience that health care systems "don’t understand the intersection of HIPAA and mobile, and their reaction is to say ‘no’, [which means that] apps that improve outcomes don’t make it through the front door.”

Blaming the government for a regulated industry's failure to understand regulations, and suggesting that the government should publish its regulations through channels other than the official channels are interesting strategies. It seems to me that there are more productive ways of engaging with the issues.

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August 27, 2014

Health Care Conferences This Fall

Friendship Pins No 89 David HarlowYour faithful HealthBlawger will be out and about at a number of conferences and events this fall, speaking, moderating . . . and immoderately disrupting.

I hope to see you at one or more of these. See descriptions below for links to registration.

Keep an eye out for "Friendship Pins" -- my jacket from The Walking Gallery, pictured here -- and I will be in or near it.

If you are organizing a conference a little further down the road, please consider including me as a keynote speaker or otherwise. We should talk.

Here's the rundown:

HIMSS Privacy & Security Forum

September 8-9, 2014, Boston, MA

I'll be one of the general session speakers: Keeping Your Edge: Managing Social Media While Protecting Privacy & Security.

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July 16, 2014

Consumer Generated Data: Your "Data Exhaust"

YourDataItsOutThere_InfographicYou might be surprised to learn how wide your digital footprint is these days.

It is worth getting up to speed on this issue by reading Jane Sarasohn-Kahn's latest report for the California Healthcare Foundation, entitled Here's Looking at You: How Personal Information Is Being Tracked and Used. I enjoyed speaking with Jane about these issues as she was researching and writing the report.

Some highlights:

1.    Most people are unaware that they are leaving their personal data behind and that some of this information is not protected by HIPAA. Data brokers are able to build dossiers on individuals to sell to marketers, while consumers lack recourse to obtain or correct their information.

2.    Clinical researchers, health plans, and others use the information to enhance individuals' health as well as to benefit public health. Larger and speedier clinical trials are made possible by the quantity of data available.

3.    Different types of information — such as historical claims data and consumer-generated data — can be combined and used for statistical modeling for health or financial risk-profiling. Such information is purchased by hedge funds, hospitals, large provider networks, payers, pharmaceutical companies, and others.

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June 17, 2014

FDA continues to detail types of mHealth apps it will not regulate

FDASince issuing its mobile medical applications guidance, the FDA has offered a number of clarifying statements, intended to give the regulated community a clearer idea of whether and when to expect any particular mHealth application to be considered a device.

Last week, the FDA added a category of applications with respect to which it intends to "exercise enforcement discretion" (i.e., not regulate):

  • Mobile apps that allows a user to collect, log, track and trend data such as blood glucose, blood pressure, heart rate, weight or other data from a device to eventually share with a heath care provider, or upload it to an online (cloud) database, personal or electronic health record. [Added June 11, 2014].

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